Cold Compression & Performance Boot

Cold Compression

Flowboot: Cold Compression – Ankle & Flexor

FlowBoot intended for cold therapy is three times the foam in comparison to the performance boot. It is an easy, safe, and effective way of providing cold compression. The open cell foam will absorb water, which can be frozen or submersed in ice water. Cold compression is significantly colder than ice alone due to improved skin contact and increased tissue density. Tissue reaches its lowest temperature faster and the tissue maintains it is cool even after treatment ends. One size fits all. Wraps are 6 inches wide making it easy to apply. Twenty minutes of even pressure without cutting off the blood flow to the foot, ideal therapy post strenuous work. Flowboot targets the superficial digital flexor tendon and proximal sesamoid area, which is where most problems occur. Keeping the heat and swelling out promotes recovery and prevents soreness.

  1. Soak boots in water over night, then place individually in a plastic bag.
  2. Stuff the top of the bag inside the middle portion of the boots to keep sides from touching and place in freezer until frozen. (The plastic keeps the boots from sticking to each other and to the freezer.)
  3. When ready to use, thaw the boot slightly in water or add a little water to plastic.
  4. Once pliable, strap on boots with the wrap.
  5. Leave the boots on 20 to 30 minutes. (20 minutes is what the medical feld recommends, but if there is an injury or hot spot, reapply multiple times.)
  6. If on the road, keep the boots in ice water. *It’s best to use when the horses body is already cooled off. Rubbing alcohol can be used to disinfect and will help the cold. Water is the conducting element and transfers the cold, best when wet.

Flowboot: Cold Compression – Hock & Knee

The Cold Compression Hock and Knee boot has 30 ice blankets embedded inside a pillow of soft foam. Combined with a wrap, the foam is compressed making cold therapy easy and effective. No pumps, hoses, wires, or need to readjust. We all know cryotherapy is the best, but it is expensive and time consuming. Not anymore! Freeze the boot, wrap it, providing a soft, even, and penetrating cold. Imagine a memory foam pillow with ice inside – soft yet cold. Horses love it, no hard ice on the skin, or unevenness of cold. Frozen the boot will stay cold well past the recommended time of 15 to 20 minutes.

With compression, the cold transfers deeply taking out the heat preventing soreness and inflammation. This unique design makes this boot versatile and can be used on knees or hocks. One size fits all. Sold in pairs – two boots and two wraps. This product makes all the other boots and gadgets obsolete. Try it for yourself and if you don’t agree, send it back for a full refund. This patent pending concept is a must have for instant treatment.

  • Decreased muscle spasms
  • Decreased tissue damage
  • Decreased swelling

When a horse sustains an injury, there is always a risk for inflammation and tissue damage. Research shows that cold compression therapy can shorten recovery time by as much as 50%.

Use cold compression therapy when your horse experiences:

  • Sore tendons and muscles surrounding joints
  • Sore feet
  • Inflammation around the feet

For more information about when to use cold compression therapy, consult your equine veterinarian.

  1. Soak boots in water over night, then place individually in a plastic bag.
  2. Stuff the top of the bag inside the middle portion of the boots to keep sides from touching and place in freezer until frozen. (The plastic keeps the boots from sticking to each other and to the freezer.)
  3. When ready to use, thaw the boot slightly in water or add a little water to plastic.
  4. Once pliable, strap on boots with the wrap.
  5. Leave the boots on 20 to 30 minutes. (20 minutes is what the medical feld recommends, but if there is an injury or hot spot, reapply multiple times.)
  6. If on the road, keep the boots in ice water. *It’s best to use when the horses body is already cooled off. Rubbing alcohol can be used to disinfect and will help the cold. Water is the conducting element and transfers the cold, best when wet.

IMG_0536-1_crop
Chief

Performance Boot

“Fetlock injuries are the greatest cause of fatal musculoskeletal injuries in Thoroughbreds and 34–40% of deaths due to musculoskeletal injuries in Quarter Horses. Proximal sesamoid bone fractures are the most common cause of fetlock injury. Further, 36% of non–fatal injuries affected the proximal sesamoid bones (7%) or fetlock support structures (29%)Susan Stover, University Of California-Davis”

Flowboot is designed specifically to protect and support the fetlock and proximal sesamoid. No other product compares to this unique design. A tight wrap combined with the soft foam cushions the fetlock, gives support, and strike protection.

Statistics show us how important and how frail this area is and yet until now there has been no advancement in technology. Conventional sports boots are basically all the same and offer little in support and tie into the pasterns inhibiting motion of the ankle, not to mention the sand that gets inside. Wraps offer little in strike protection. People have an aversion to wrapping having heard “If you wrap wrong you can do more harm than good”. Well FlowBoot has taken out the dangers of a bad wrap and has designed an anatomical boot which contours the leg and when wrapped doesn’t cut off the flow of blood, hence the name FlowBoot. We will mention no sand gets inside. They can even be used in extreme wet and muddy conditions without becoming heavy and full of mud. This is achieved with a slight compression of the foam on the leg for a perfect conforming fit. The wrap compounds the strike protection, and really cushions the fetlock. It is amazing how the ankle will actually hit the ground when in full stride. All the weight of horse, tack, and rider bares down on the fetlock with tremendous force. Nature has given us a perfect but fragile mechanism in a load and release system composed of tendons, ligaments, and two little proximal sesamoid bones. Injecting ankles is expensive, temporary, and creates long-term damage and dependency, why not prevent and protect with FlowBoot? The concept has been around now for a few years and has developed. We know that it really delivers and so do the many clients who have used the product. Often people are buying in to provide more support for a horse that is coming off an injury, or are simply not happy with what is out there in the way of protection. There is a short learning curve in how to apply FlowBoots, give them a try and if it does’t work for you or your horse we will refund your money. We stand behind our product and strive to keep customers happy.

www.flowboot.com

This concept makes a great rundown boot to boot.

Performance Boot Packaging

enigma

Human Cold Compression Ice Boot

  1. Cold and compression are routinely applied immediately after acute injury or following surgery to alleviate pain, reduce swelling and speed functional recovery.
  2. Because the benefits of cold compression therapy diminish with time, this intervention is thought to be most effective if applied almost immediately after injury or at the conclusion of an operative procedure.
  3. The local application of cold suppresses the metabolic rate of the immediately surrounding soft tissue. This decrease in tissue metabolism is associated with a reduction in enzymatic activity, preventing tissue damage caused by hypoxia. Local hypothermia induces vasoconstriction and lowers microcirculation by more than 60%, an effect that can persist for up to 30 minutes after cessation of cooling. Cold-induced vasoconstriction reduces extravasation of blood into surroundings tissues, local inflammation and edema production. The amelioration of pain associated with the direct application of cold to injured tissue is, in part, related to the reduction in edema formation as well as to decreases in motor and sensory nerve conduction.
  4. A reduction in blood flow and swelling also can be achieved with compression by facilitating translocation of edema away from the site of injury and toward proximal noncompressed tissues where it can be resolved more efficiently by the lymphatic system. Importantly, the addition of cold to compression increases the rate, magnitude and depth of temperature reduction, as well as the speed of lymph evacuation

Ice Boot Packaging